Yellowdig vs Piazza: A Guide

As instructors begin to look for technologies that stray away from traditional hierarchical discussion boards, a problem they may come into is making a decision on which to use. Let’s look at Yellowdig and Piazza as an example: they are both platforms that provide solutions for the classroom, but what’s the difference?

YD vs Piazza (2).png
 

Yellowdig for Virtual Classrooms

Yellowdig’s platform promotes gameful learning, allowing incentives for students to post more and engage with other students. Through accolades, as well as our point system, students can be motivated to actively participate in their community.

 

Our social media-esque platform features a single scrolling feed, making it feel familiar and easy to use. Just like other social media platforms, users can see and make reactions or comments. This promotes genuine conversation between students, encourages Q&A, and inspires students to truly have deep discussions. Our platform avoids faculty overhead, allowing students to engage and learn with and from each other.

 

Our platform seamlessly integrates with many LMS, and our point system allows for easy, automated grading. Through our analytics pages, instructors have access to data showing student engagement in the classroom. Our platform is proven to have a strong impact on student retention.

Piazza for Virtual Classrooms

Piazza is a platform offering a wiki-style format that enables collaboration in a single space, and integrates with most LMS. Their wiki-style format allows other students to make changes or edits to a single post. Although the platform promotes Q&A, it strays away from allowing students to have deep, meaningful conversations with each other, decreasing in-class engagement between peers.

 

The wiki-style format allows instructors to finalize answers to questions, but the platform lacks incentives for students to post more. Students are still graded by the instructor, which can result in faculty overhead and decreasing classroom engagement.

 

Piazza is not backed by research for student retention.